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Criminal Justice Research

Here you can find some of the most recent articles by our nationally recognized faculty.

Increasing the effectiveness of correctional programming through the risk principle: Identifying offenders for residential placement

Christopher T. Lowenkamp University of Cincinnati Edward J. Latessa University of Cincinnati * This research was supported by a contract from the State of Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction. The views and opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The State of Ohio Department [...]

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The Ins and Outs of Getting Your MCJ Online

Pursuing Your MCJ Online: Where to Start & What to Expect Now that you’ve made the decision to earn your MCJ degree online, it’s time to explore the many criminal justice master’s programs available to you. Choosing the right program for your needs can include considerations such as: Is this program 100% online or will [...]

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The Evolution of the American Justice System

400 Years of Change:  The American Justice System The evolution of the American justice system is a fascinating subject that can lead to years of historical study and exploration. A good criminal justice graduate program will give you enough knowledge to leave you craving more. Our country is rich in folklore and fact when it [...]

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Community corrections centers, parolees, and recidivism: An investigation into the characteristics of effective reentry programs in Pennsylvania

Edward J. Latessa, Ph.D. Professor and Division Head University of Cincinnati School of Criminal Justice Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0389 Edward.Latessa@uc.edu Christopher T. Lowenkamp, Ph.D. Assistant Research Professor Director Center for Criminal Justice Research University of Cincinnati School of Criminal Justice Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0389 Christopher.Lowenkamp@uc.edu Kristin Bechtel, M.S. Research Assistant Center for Criminal Justice Research University of [...]

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Applying the principles of effective intervention to juvenile correctional programs

Pealer, Jennifer A., Latessa, Edward J. (2004). Applying the Principles of Effective Intervention To Juvenile Correctional Programs. Corrections Today, 66 (7). In 1989, Gendreau and Andrews developed the Correctional Program Assessment Inventory (CPAI). This tool is designed to evaluate the integrity of a correctional program to determine the degree to which it meets certain principles. [...]

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Using learning as a construct to measure civilian review board impact on the police: The Philippine experience

Melchor C de Guzman, James Frank. Policing. Bradford: 2004. Vol. 27, Iss. 2; pg. 166 Abstract (Summary) Determining the impact of civilian review board on the police is a challenging process. The task is complicated due to the absence of baseline data that will account for observed changes in citizen complaints, especially if the concept [...]

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The twelve people who saved rehabilitation: How the science of criminology made a difference

The American Society of Criminology 2004 Presidential Address Francis T. Cullen University of Cincinnati For most of us, there is perhaps the nagging suspicion that what we do as criminologists does not matter. There are, of course, the students we teach and help, the local agencies to whom we give a needed hand, and the [...]

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The scholarly productivity of institutions and their faculty in leading criminology and criminal justice journals

Benjamin Steiner Division of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati, 600 Dyer Hall, P. O. Box 210389, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0389, United States John Schwartz Division of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati, 600 Dyer Hall, P. O. Box 210389, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0389, United States Abstract This study extended the work of Sorensen and Pilgrim (2002) by examining [...]

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Conceptualizing criminal justice theory

Abstract (Summary) In an attempt to advance the development and generalization of criminal justice theory as a whole, Bernard and Engel propose a framework for classifying specific criminal justice theories. They also present an interpretive history of the academic field of criminal justice to demonstrate how the field can be organized within that framework. FULL [...]

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Criminal justice in the lives of American adolescents: Choosing the future

Criminal Justice in the Lives of American Adolescents: Choosing the Future Francis T. Cullen University of Cincinnati John Paul Wright University of Cincinnati Forthcoming in: Jeylan Mortimer and Reed Larson (eds.), The Future of the Adolescent Experience: Societal Trends and the Transition to Adulthood in the 21st Century. New York: Cambridge University Press. Although most [...]

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Toward a better understanding of racial and ethnic disparities in search and seizure rates

Robin S. Engel Division of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati, P. O. Box 210389, Cincinnati, OH 45230, United States Richard Johnson Department of Criminal Justice, Benton Hall 206, Washburn University, 1700 SW College, Topeka, KS 66621, United States Abstract Recent studies demonstrated a consistent research finding that compared to Caucasian motorists, Black and Hispanic motorists [...]

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Citizens’ perceptions of distributive and procedural injustice during traffic stops with police

Robin Shepard Engel This article examines the hypothesis that citizens’ perceptions of injustice are based on normative factors (i.e., perceptions of equity and fairness) rather than instrumental factors (i.e., the outcomes received) by examining citizens’ perceptions of injustice after traffic stops by police. The factors that predict citizens’ perceptions of injustice are assessed using data [...]

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Revisiting the decision to arrest: comparing beat and community officers

Kenneth J. Novak Department of Sociology/Criminal Justice & Criminology, University of Missouri–Kansas City. James Frank Division of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati. Brad W. Smith Department of Criminal Justice, Wayne State University Robin Shepard Engel Department of Sociology, Pennsylvania State University. During the past 30 years, an expanding body of literature has evolved that examines [...]

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Theories of Rehabilitation

Thoughts on Rehabilitation and Recidivism The theory that prisoners could be rehabilitated and returned to society as productive citizens first emerged in the early 1900’s. It’s an idea that has since been debated for almost a century, as recidivism rates are often disappointing in the face of optimism. It is estimated that over 65 percent [...]

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Why Analyze Criminal Behavior?

Understanding Criminal Behavioral Analysis For over 40 years, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has led the way in the study of behavioral science as it applies to criminal activity. The procedures and policies developed by the FBI at their Behavioral Science Unit in Quantico, Virginia, have since become the standard which law enforcement agencies now [...]

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Does correctional program quality really matter? The impact of adhering to the principles of effective intervention 2006

Christopher T. Lowenkamp Division of Criminal Justice University of Cincinnati Edward J. Latessa Division of Criminal Justice University of Cincinnati Paula Smith Division of Criminal Justice University of Cincinnati This research was supported by a contract from the State of Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction. The views and opinions expressed are those of the [...]

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Exploring the validity of the Level of Service Inventory-Revised with Native American offenders

Alexander M. Holsinger 208 Haag Hall, Department of Sociology/Criminal Justice and Criminology, University of Missouri – Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110-2499, United States Christopher T. Lowenkamp Corrections Institute, University of Cincinnati, P. O. Box 210389, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0389, United States Edward J. Latessa Division of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati, P. O. Box 210389, [...]

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Predicting outcome with the Level of Service Inventory-Revised: The importance of implementation integrity

Anthony W. Flores Department of Criminal Justice, California State University, Bakersfield, 24 DDH, 9001 Stockdale Highway, Bakersfield, CA 93311–1099, United States. Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 661 665 6794; fax: +1 661 665 6955. E-mail address: aflores14@csub.edu (A.W. Flores). Christopher T. Lowenkamp Division of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati, P. O. Box 210389, Cincinnati, OH 45221–0389, [...]

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Nothing works revisited: Deconstructing Farabee’s “Rethinking Rehabilitation”

Francis T. Cullen, Paula Smith, Christopher T. Lowenkamp, and Edward J. Latessa Division of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA Abstract: In Rethinking Rehabilitation, Farabee claims that offender treatment is a failed enterprise and instead proposes a correctional approach that emphasizes deterrence through intensive supervision, electronic monitoring, and indeterminate parole sentences. We argue [...]

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Applying the risk principle to sex offenders: Can treatment make some sex offenders worse?

Brian Lovins University of Cincinnati, Ohio Christopher T. Lowenkamp University of Cincinnati, Ohio Edward J. Latessa University of Cincinnati, Ohio The risk principle states that higher risk offenders should receive more intensive services, whereas lower risk offenders should receive less intensive services. However, the criminal justice system routinely ignores the risk principle for sex offenders [...]

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Technological approaches to controlling random gunfire: Results of a gunshot detection system field test

Cory Watkins, Lorraine Green Mazerolle, Dennis Rogan, James Frank. Policing. Bradford: 2002. Vol. 25, Iss. 2; pg. 345, 26 pgs Abstract (Summary) Using a quasi-experimental design methodology, this paper reports the results from a controlled field evaluation of the ShotSpotter gunshot location technology in Redwood City, California. Results from this field test indicate that overall, [...]

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Examining the influence of drivers’ characteristics during traffic stops with police: results from a national survey

Abstract (Summary) The factors that influence officer decision making after a traffic stop is initiated are examined using the Police-Public Contact Survey data collected in 1999. This investigation of police behavior is framed with an understanding of the organizational roots of racial profiling tactics and policies. The findings show that young black and Hispanic males [...]

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Policing mentally disordered suspects: A reexamination of the criminalization hypothesis

Abstract (Summary) In a study, data collected from the Project on Policing Neighborhoods and the Police Services Study were used to determine the relationship between suspect mental health and use of arrest by police. Multivariate results show that police are not more likely to arrest mentally disordered suspects. FULL TEXT The criminalization hypothesis is based [...]

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The state of ISP: research and policy implications

INTENSIVE SUPERVISION programs (ISP) are among the most popular forms of alternative sanctions in the United States. Every state has some type of ISP operating within its boundaries. A review of literature since the 1993 release of the RAND results,(FN1) however, reveals a dearth of empirical assessments of ISP, leaving practitioners and policy makers floundering [...]

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Theory and racial profiling: Shortcomings and future directions in research

Abstract (Summary) This article reviews recently published studies on racial profiling and critiques both their methods and conclusions. Using the conceptual framework for police research presented by Bernard and Engel, it reviews a number of theories that may explain racial disparities in the rates of police stops. The authors argue that to explain police behavior [...]

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Police officers’ attitudes, behavior, and supervisory influences: An analysis of problem solving*

Abstract (Summary) This paper examines the influence of officers’ and supervisors’ attitudes and priorities toward community policing and problem solving over the time officers spend conducting problem-solving activities. Analyzing data collected for the Project on Policing Neighborhoods, a multi-method study of police patrol in two police departments, results show that officers’ perceptions of their supervisors’ [...]

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UC Research Examines How White-Collar Criminals Adjust to Prison Life

Date: 10/21/2013 10:00:00 AM By: M.B. Reilly Phone: (513) 556-1824 * White-collar criminals – those convicted of fraud, embezzlement, tax violation, anti-trust and other business offenses – have no more problems adjusting to prison than those in a general prison population. In fact, when it comes to specific adjustment issues – problems with cell mates, [...]

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The challenge of change: Correctional programs and evidence-based practices

Latessa, Edward J. (2004). The Challenge of Change: Correctional Programs and Evidence-Based Practices. Criminology & Public Policy, Volume 3 Number 4, pp 547-560. Abstract (Summary) Latessa examines the correctional programs and treatment efforts across the US. His observations on the challenge of change in corrections suggest that having a strong leadership is a necessary ingredient [...]

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